Bill Introduced In Texas Legislature To Prohibit Employer From Asking You About Your Social Media Password.

Having solved all the other problems in Texas, including the problem of gun violence (prayer) and the problem of uninsured citizens (cutting Medicaid) the Texas legislature has turned to the burning issue of employers requiring employees to provide access information to employee's private social media accounts.

House Bill 318 has been introduced to make it an "unfair employment practice" if an employer "...requires or requests that an employee or applicant for employment disclose a user name, password, or other means for accessing a personal account of the employee or applicant, including a personal e-mail account or a social networking website account or profile, through an electronic communication device."

This bill still allows "monitoring" employee usage of employer provided media and also allows employer policies prohibiting use of company provided resources for personal use.  It doesn't provide for a specific remedy or a damages cap and it will likely be amended substantially before it passes, if it passes at all.  This would make Texas one of a handful of states that has jumped on this burning issue.  Crisis averted.

UPDATE: Ownership of Company's Twitter Account: Company vs. Employee

Almost a year ago, we mentioned the unusual case of PhoneDog v. Kravitz, where a former employee was sued by his former employer for $340,000, which amounted to $2.50 per Twitter follower that the employee took when he left the company.

We indicated that this was a gray area and developing.  So, how did PhoneDog v. Kravitz enlighten us on the rules for this situation?  Exactly none.  Mashable reports that the parties have settled after months of mediation.  Settlement terms are confidential but apparently Mr. Kravitz retained the Twitter followers and there was no indication of money changing hands.

Where does this leave us?  Back at square one but with some lessons learned.  For example, if ownership and control of Twitter accounts is important to your business, state in the employment contract or the employee manual that such accounts belong to the company.  Eliminate any drama by addressing the issue head on.  #commonsense

Who Owns Your Social Media Account? You Or Your Employer?

Here's the situation:  You establish a Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, etc. account while you are employed and use the account to tweet, post, blog, etc. about your employer.  Then your employer falls out of love with you and you are no longer employed.  Who owns your followers on Twitter or your Facebook or LinkedIn account?  That's a really good question and one that the courts are dealing with right now.

Rich Sanchez was an anchor on CNN and has a Twitter account with the handle: "richsanchezcnn".  Rich was rendered unemployed because of some ill advised statements he made.  So, does CNN own the account or was Rich popular with the Twitter followers because of his good looks and sex appeal or because he was on CNN?  Should he have to change his handle?  This was settled out of sight, so we don't know what happened there.

On another front, a company called PhoneDog LLC filed a suit against former employee Noah Kravitz.  Noah tweeted while an employee of PhoneDog under the name "PhoneDog_Noah" but then changed it to "noahkravitz" after the break up.  PhoneDog alleges that Noah's 17,000 followers are worth $2.50 per month for 8 months and are asking for a $340,000 judgment against our friend Noah.  PhoneDog has, for the moment, survived a motion for summary judgment with the judge finding enough question of fact about "trade secrets" in the account to let the case go on for a little longer.

Then there's the strange case of Dr. Linda Eagle, who was one of the original founders of Sawabeh Information Services.  As is the case sometimes, all the founders were fired and Sawabeh alleges that it owns Dr. Eagle's LinkedIn account and that she has somehow "misappropriated" her own  account.  As you know, most LinkedIn accounts (as was Dr. Eagle's) are in the employee's name alone and refers to the company in the employment history and in the connections established.

We have explored the issues of who owns clients of an LLC and whether a toxic ex-spouse might have some rights in a patent in a community property state, but this is an area of the law that is developing.

In most instances, this is probably not a huge issue but employers who want to have control over these accounts (and the wisdom of this should be evaluated thoroughly), should provide guidelines in the social media section of their employment rules.  If stated clearly, there seems to be no reason why the employer would not be entitled to control and ownership of such accounts if they fall into the parameters set out in such policy.  Otherwise, it's pretty gray.

White House Goes Web 2.0 For State of the Union. Republicans Pretty Sure This Is Not What The Founding Fathers Intended.

President Obama will move the web tonight with an interactive site for the State of the Union Address, which will live stream the speech along with charts and statistics to provide context and emphasize key points.  During the speech, aides will be using Twitter to comment on the speech.  You can participate in the Twitter feed by going @whitehouse with the hashtag #sotu.

Participants can also post to the White House's Facebook wall or they can submit questions and comments through the website's webform.

Tomorrow the White House press secretary's office will take questions from the public, which you can follow on Twitter on @PressSec and then respond using the hashtag #1Q.  On Thursday President Obama will answer questions in a live YouTube interview and certain policy experts will have online discussions where questions can be submitted via Facebook.  Then the crowning event will be Vice President Biden answering your questions on Friday by way of Yahoo.

All in all, quite an interactive event.  The only thing missing is keyboard cat.

Tweeting in the Courtroom: Ex-Governor Edition

The federal corruption trial of Ex-Governor of Illinois Rod Blagojevich is set to start this week, but the judge first had to order Blagojevich not to use Twitter from inside the courtroom.  The shameless flamboyant Blagojevich had stated earlier that he planned to "live-tweet" the trial during the proceedings, but the judge was having none of it.

The judge told him that he is still free to tweet and talk to the media all he wants outside the courtroom, but with the warning that everything he says can be used against him in the trial.  No word yet on whether Blago will try to update his Facebook status or "check-in" on Foursquare in the courtroom.  Stay tuned.